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'Frog' Morton continues to teach

This article was published in the Queanbeyan Age on 13 April 2004.

For those of you that are wondering, Frog Morton is still alive and kicking, literally.

Over the past ten weeks, dan grades of the Peter Morton Academy of Judo Jujitsu Karate have had the pleasure of participating in a course presented by Frog on advanced nerve centre strikes and street-wise defence techniques.

Frog, now seventy-one on the age scale, never ceases to amaze. His knowledge and toughness combined with his compassion for his fellow man is something that all should aspire to.

Slowed somewhat by his physical restraints, he still has a few tricks for students when he demonstrates a technique. He always pulls a surprise from his bag of knowledge - so when you train with him you are always on guard. It is very hard to surrender yourself to him when you are chosen as the body that he wishes to demonstrate on, you know that you will feel pain no matter haw gentle he is.

Junior members of the academy got to have a bit of fun on Saturday 27 March when the Kaleen branch hosted the academy's ACT annual Junior Seminar.

These seminars are designed to make learning fun and encourage younger members to want to improve themselves and their lives, in both the physical and mental sides, through the martial arts.

Members are shown and practice new techniques, old techniques and play games, but best of all they are able to take on their Senseis (teachers) and win a few games against them.

Younger members love a chance to challenge and beat a Sensei at a seminar. It is one of the very few times that positions can be reversed and the teacher becomes the student or, as in this case, the teacher ends face down and flat out on the mat with many small bodies piled on top accompanied by screams of triumph and laughter!

Not to be outdone on the fun scale by the younger members, the senior members had their day at the Annual National Seminar last October. This is for senior members only.

These seminars are run over two and a half days, covering techniques, teaching methods, etiquette and self-improvement. There are usually guest speakers and demonstrations from other martial arts groups and a guest physical trainer is thrown in for good measure.

Overall a seminar, be it junior or senior, is a good place to improve, learn, socialise and make new friends. It brings branches of the academy from all over the nation together and for a short time it is one big family.

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